Posts made in February, 2013

Fine Lines Winter Edition!

Fine Lines Winter Edition!

It’s out now, beautiful and full of wonderful writing. Get your copy today!   And don’t forget about the Fine Lines Summer Writing...

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The Broken Pottery Shop by Debra L. Hall

In a time when the world had lost the concept of forgiveness and had forgotten the meaning of love, a young girl named Rayna walked to the edge of sadness and there she took up residence in a rundown cottage, overgrown by tangled brambles. “It is better to be alone than lonely,” she reasoned. The humble dwelling had once belonged to a cruel man who, over time, had filled the rooms with broken dreams, shattered plans and mismatched cast-a-ways. Every nook and cranny was smothered in cobwebs and dark secrets. Gloomy shadows refused to give way to light. Rayna recognized the despair. It was the very likeness of her wretched past. She thought it a suitable home. Nonetheless, Rayna’s family had instilled kindness in her. They had taught her the true meaning of goodness and love. She still wanted to believe in happiness. She thought by separating herself she could re-invent virtue and thus re-discover faith. and so began her long journey. She built a roaring fire in the grate and kept it burning for many days and long countless nights. She threw dreadful thoughts and painful feelings from her tremulous past into the flames. She shouted every lost dream and wish at the inferno, even those lurking in her cottage. When at last the fire dwindled away, a calm breeze parted the curtains and washed over her. She took in a long deep breath and felt her empty heart filling with all that is beautiful and pure. Rayna’s father was a potter. While Rayna was growing up, he taught her to create by molding and shaping the earth. Warm memories stirred inside her as she propped a sign in the window facing the footpath. It read: “The Broken Pottery Shop.” So it was that Rayna began to heal. She gathered clay from the earth. She molded, shaped and re-shaped. She twisted and tied and added brilliant colors made from discarded leaves and tangled wildflowers. Finally, warm energy filled her soul with vibrant light. As word of Rayna’s creations spread, the villagers began to bring their broken pottery to her. They offered trade goods in exchange for repairs to their once beautiful possessions. Rayna obtained an over abundance of ill-looking jugs, vases, bowls, urns and lame statues. After countless broken items appeared outside her door, she replaced the sign in the window with one that read: Closed for repairs. Day after day Rayna stared at the pathetic mounds of damaged pottery. She wept when she realized that everyone had kept shattered remnants of their past. Perhaps what they really wanted, she thought, was that last nurturing moment of happiness, a sense of having been useful, having belonged to someone...

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