Posts made in August, 2015

Content in My Bliss

Content in My Bliss

Someone once said they read books to discover the souls of others. I write to discover my own. I want to discover who I am. Few things in life teach me who I am more than writing in my journal does. This desire for self-knowledge inspires me to write almost every day. I seldom lack inspiration to write, but I often lose my focus. I spend too much time doing many things other than writing. Earning money, pursuing life’s pleasures, and trying to please others causes me to get lost in the fog of daily existence. I get tired making a living in a stressful environment. I feel waves of people, emotions, and work wash over me and knock me off my feet. I search for my footing in my journal. I look for meaningful reflections in my sentences and metaphors, and my journal becomes a symbol revealing my true self. I want to be good at a few things in life. Conveying accurate images through my choice of words is one of them. I want to use my gifts well.  Simple things in life inspire me to write. My heart lifts when I see a male cardinal in a bare tree above the mounds of white snow. My soul warms when I see a strong, male hand hold a tiny child’s little fingers. Fathers teaching sons and daughters the sacrifices needed to reach maturity turn my pages. Lovers look into each other’s eyes and inspire me to paint the scene with words. Close friends sitting together, silently drinking coffee, as they watch moisture form on a window while the cold, Nebraska wind howls outside makes me warm to the possibilities. I am urged to write when I feel friendly eyes locate me in a crowded room; when loved ones bare their souls to me; when a student comes to class with the attitude, “I am ready to learn today, and you can teach me.” I write eating gumbo, listening to Cajun music. I look for pen and paper when I hear the carol, “Silent Night,” pierce the air on Christmas Eve. I sit down under a tree to record my emotions when my daughter chooses on her own to take the training wheels off and ride her bicycle solo for the first time. Ray Charles’ “Georgia,” Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata,” and the children’s story, “The Little Engine That Could” all speak to me in the same way. I can not pass up these opportunities. When my work captivates me, when I hear, “Daddy, I love you!” when I see outstretched hands reaching for a baby’s face, when I feel soft fingers on my shoulder, when I hear the words,...

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From the Journal – Artwork

From the Journal – Artwork

We feature not only essays, poetry, short stories and other word-based art, but also artwork in every Fine Lines Journal. Here’s a peek at page 63 of the summer issue – >   Share...

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From the Journal – Creator by Emma Vinchur

From the Journal – Creator by Emma Vinchur

Whenever I am told, “I wish I could draw beautiful things like you!” I get a little irked. Where other people see a hand, I see a snarky group of appendages that blatantly told me, “No!” nearly every time I tried in vain to paint them. An onlooker may see the sculpted face of a woman, while I see a dame I had to beg on bended knee to be drawn the way I envisioned her, a female who needed to be tempted with my hours of frustration and dedication until she was satisfied. Where they see “pretty,” I see work. Simplified, being an artist is a messy business. Criminal I have committed so many crimes in the name of art that I run out of fingers and toes to count them. Murder, abandonment, the list goes on. I have ripped pieces to shreds and left others to collect dust. Artwork that I have invested emotion and time into has gone awry, leaving me a wounded creator with a failed creation. Ink stains, paint explosions, clay dust, they have all marked (and ruined) the clothes I own. The Muse The muse I so desperately try to please is a cruel mistress. She comes in at all hours of the day and night, at the most inconvenient times, so drunk on inspiration that she cannot be understood or so dry and lifeless that she needs nursing back to health. I have ignored food and sleep for the sake of my craft. The emotion I invest in my work can eat at me for days, happiness or sadness, regardless. One is unable to be an artist without feeling all emotions in such extremes that it can be a little sickening at times. The question is: Why do it at all? Answer That answer is simple. To stop doing it, to cease creating, would be the end of me. By divine design, I am a creator, but less formally known as an artist. I do not know how to be anything else. Everything I do is done out of the pure love of my craft. I believe in the magic and authority of art, and in my ability to harness that magic. I create out of necessity, not out of vanity. My art is my life-blood, an entity on its own. I paint, I draw, I write to continue my own existence, to catalog the events that shape my human experience. Ultimately, I hope the anthology I am constructing will be of use to someone else. A world-wide fame is not what I am after, but if my work can impact one soul’s life, it will have all been worth it. I am...

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Write On Book Bag Available for a Limited Time

Write On Book Bag Available for a Limited Time

Fellow Writers and Readers … We are doing our first ever Booster.Com Fundraiser and what better item to start with than a Write On Book bag!       This is a limited time offer – expires in less than 2 weeks! Please consider supporting Fine Lines with a purchase and optional additional donation.  Click through on the photo to the Booster Fundraising Page.  Share with your friends! Share...

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From Pain to Purpose

From Pain to Purpose

“Writing is the only thing. When I do it, I don’t feel I should be doing something else”  – Gloria Steinem Motivation Motivation is moving towards a goal. Abraham Maslow, the famous psychologist, said there were two kinds of motivation: deficiency motivation (changing an unsatisfactory situation) and being motivation (seeking a positive goal after lower order needs are met). People may use writing to achieve either type of motivation. Writers often build armor around their psyches by using words to overcome inferiority (deficiency motivation). They add layers of protection and self-esteem to inner feelings of inadequacy and learn to compete with no one but themselves. What they write is personal. Fear, shyness, inferiority, and inadequacy rise into the open on the writer’s own terms, in safety, and confidentiality. Writers construct strong foundations with words to support their needs. A firm outer image develops through the writing process because the inner image is patched and repaired (being motivation). Journal writers develop healthy egos. Formal writing, to prove ourselves to others, to be accepted, and to receive better grades is not the reason one usually writes in a personal notebook. Some of this writing could develop I to a product one might turn in for a school assignment because an intellectual component surfaces. Journal writing wants to penetrate the flab, the insincere, and the lies of life. With the proper attitude, it touches unacknowledged feelings, becomes character completion, attitude development, and a healing form of expression, not just for the classroom but for life. It involves self-study, life education, skill, effort, a positive attitude, and discipline. Move towards Self Personal writing may require increased introversion, a change in value systems, and a movement toward self-realization. It reduces one’s ego and increases the development of creativity. It ties the unconscious to the conscious. Albert Einstein said, “ The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and science.” Writing gives us a tool for probing the mysterious, the unknown in our unconscious and connects it to our awareness. Awake Being awake in all aspects of life teaches us that we do not know as much about ourselves as we think. Intensive journalizing shows us there is more to explore than people previously thought, and one of the best to do this is to write about our dream images which illustrate psychological archetypes from our collective unconscious. Dreams restore emotional balance by igniting spontaneous creations the writer builds upon. Carl Jung, the founder of analytical psychology, used the term “archetypes,” psychic structures that organize and hold material in our unconscious file folders during our dreams reveal important ideas about ourselves. Intuitive writing is one...

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